“The ladder is this simple, simple thing — you can buy a ladder for $50 and you can climb over a wall that they spent $500,000 to build,” Holslin said. “It’s this simple technology that defeats every effort of the government to create this massive image of impermeability and absolute power.”

Los Angeles Times: Border wall prototypes become canvas for light graffiti

Jill Marie Holslin, artist

 

“I felt kind of sick as a U.S. citizen,” he said, referring to Mr. Trump’s immigration policies. “I didn’t want folks in Mexico to think this is how we all feel.”

Andrew Sturm, artist


This image is a play on words between “¡Llegale!,” meaning “come in,” and “illegal.” (Jill Marie Holslin)

Ordinary Californians have found other ways to push back.

One of them is Andrew Sturm, a graduate student in visual arts at the University of California, San Diego. Last year, Mr. Sturm was with a friend in Tijuana, Mexico, at a spot near the border where prototypes of Mr. Trump’s planned wall had been positioned.

“We were thinking, man, these things look like drive-in movie screens,” he said. “We were thinking about how we could do something with them.”

The result was a display of political art, in the form of light. One evening this fall at dusk, Mr. Sturm and other activists, working from the Mexican side of the border, erected theater lights and used stencils to project images onto the prototypes — of a ladder, of the Statue of Liberty.

“I felt kind of sick as a U.S. citizen,” he said, referring to Mr. Trump’s immigration policies. “I didn’t want folks in Mexico to think this is how we all feel.”

NYTimes: In Clash Between California and Trump, It’s One America Versus Another

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